Osmocote Advertisement
Article ThumbFive Hundred Years and Counting

The age of exploration isn’t over. The hunt continues for new and better plants continues.

Ever wonder where the plants at garden centers come from? Even the typical nursery features a depth of products resembling a virtual League of Nations. In addition to the plants native to North America, many originated in Asia, Europe and even Africa. How they got here is a very long story that dates back to the days of pharaohs, kings and queens who directed explorers to bring plants back from distant continents. They sought new varieties that ranged from purely ornamental to edible to medicinal.


Article ThumbHometown Honeys

You may have been told that bees are beneficial and that they pollinate a lot of agricultural crops. Most of the time when people talk about bees, they are talking about foreign honeybees, which were brought to North America by Europeans in the 17th century.

Honeybees are fine, but many bees that we see and call honeybees are actually native bees or flies that look like bees.

There are many other bee species native to Illinois, the Midwest and North America. While they aren’t often discussed, they do a lot of pollinating.


categories

Midwest Groundcovers Advertisement

Espoma Advertisement

popular

Article Thumbnail
Columns
A Clear and Present Danger

I was recently interviewing a well-known garden writer about the benefits of an outdoor space in which to contemplate and …


Article Thumbnail
Columns
Failure to Communicate

“Do you have geraniums?” “Pelargonium or cranesbill?” “Sorry?” “Er, Pelargonium or cranesbill.” “No, I’m not interested ...


Article Thumbnail
Columns
I Sure Won’t Do That Again Next Year

This is the time of year that many of us look back in our horticultural rearview mirrors the same way we would if we’d just ...


Article Thumbnail
Departments
From the Editor

In this issue our primary focus is on perennial gardens – beautiful perennial gardens.


Article Thumbnail
Blog
A Bulb Like No Other

A few days ago it was cool enough to go outside and see the red needles calling me. It was my fully open haemanthus, a ...


questions

How can I get rid of voles? I think they are doing a lot of damage to my bulbs.

I am growing my potted tropical hibiscus indoors for the winter. The leaves are starting to yellow and fall off. Should I give the plant iron and should I fertilize it? Do I cut it back, and if so, when?

My lilac had a grayish blight on the leaves this summer. What caused this and how can I prevent it?

ChicagolandGardening Advertisement