Osmocote Advertisement

Orchids

What causes black spots on my orchid leaves?

There are a number of causes for black spots, depending on the type of orchid.

“In some varieties, like Oncidium ‘Cherry Baby’, the small black spots through the leaf are normal,” says Liese Butler, owner, Oak Hill
Gardens, Dundee.

Black spots on the top of the leaf could be sunburn, caused when sunlight scalds a drop of water that has been left on a leaf. Newer growth of Cattleya orchids can normally have a purplish spot. A black mushy spot and a black stem indicate rot.


Page 2 of 2 pages  < 1 2

categories

popular

Article Thumbnail
Columns
Beyond Violet
African violets are pushing the envelope when it comes to colors and flower forms. Ruffles, anyone?

Article Thumbnail
Columns
Basement Bounty
Decisions, decisions. What’s a devoted gardener to do with brugmansia as winter approaches?

Article Thumbnail
Columns
Up in the Air
There’s a reason why tillandsias are called air plants. Just don’t call them airheads.

Article Thumbnail
Spotlights
A New Twist on Terrariums
They’re back, just in time for holiday decorating and gift giving! Terrariums, that is. They’ve recently made a big comeback…

Article Thumbnail
Spotlights
From Home Garden to Production Garden
Home garden or production garden? This space does both.

questions

Last summer my neighbor told me the black spots on my peony were a blight, although my peonies bloomed nicely. What can I do about this?

We moved into a house with a lovely azalea that didn’t bloom. We thought it might have been over-pruned. Last fall we did not prune it and now it still hasn’t bloomed. I was hoping to transplant it this year, but it looks rather sickly. Shall we prune it again and give it another year? Can I still transplant it?

I have a dampish area with poor grass and moss that I would like to change to ground cover, but if I have only one plant, won’t it be boring? Can I get rid of the grass in winter or early spring?

ChicagolandGardening Advertisement