Osmocote Advertisement

Overwintering Clivia

After a summer outside, my clivia has returned indoors. Last year it had only one puny flower. What treatment should I give it over winter to bring it into bloom?

A. Clivia miniata, sometimes known as Kaffir lily, a South African native, is a member of the amaryllis family. When growing clivia, it is important to observe seasonal changes. During short winter days, stop fertilizing entirely until spring, and stop watering also.

“Treat your plant like a cactus,” says Steve Butcher, tropical plant specialist at Sid’s Garden Center in Palos Hills. “You can keep it completely dry for a couple of weeks up to the point of shriveling before watering. Keep your plant in a cool place; 55 to 65 degrees is ideal, but that’s hard to achieve in many homes. It does not need a brightly lit location.”

When the days lengthen, move the plant into a brighter location and increase watering. There are no hard-and-fast rules on watering. The frequency depends on the pot size and the root mass. Use a water-soluble, high-phosphorus fertilizer every second or third watering. After you see buds, reduce fertilizer to once per month. Root bound plants flower better.

Following this regime last winter, Editor Carolyn Ulrich reported five bloom stalks on one of her plants in February. Other plants bloomed in March but one didn’t bloom until June. Clivia are considered a winter-flowering houseplant, but bloom time will vary. Be patient.


Cabbage Worms

We are first-time gardeners and have planted Brussels sprouts and green and red cabbage that we are trying to grow organically. There are black egg sacs and small green worms eating the leaves. Is there an organic product we can use on the cabbage?

Egg sacs can be washed off with a hose.

There are several organic methods you can use to deter cabbage worms. Lightweight polypropylene row covers, placed over a row of plants and supported by hoops, will block wind and insects while permitting light, air and rain to reach the plants. Hold down the row covers with soil, stones or bricks.

Another organic method uses pots of mint growing between cabbage plants. The mint odor is said to deter cabbage moths. Don’t let the mint take root, however; it will take over your garden. Rotenone dust is considered organic, as it leaves no poisonous residue on plants. The use of hot pepper spray is an irritant to insects and worms, but also to your skin and eyes. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a specific biological control that is fatal to cabbage worms if ingested. Note that it can be harmful to certain butterfly larvae.


Bulbs Over Winter

What is the best way to dig up, clean and store gladiolus and dahlias? What are the little white sacs on glad bulbs?

Gladiolus corms and dahlia tubers are generally dug up after the first frost or before Halloween. Cut off all the stems and foliage, let the plants dry, and shake off all the soil. Make sure each corm and tuber is firm and not rotted. Place them in a box or tray and cover with peat moss. If you know the cultivar name, tag the plant.

Store them in a dark, cool place, checking them over winter. If the dahlia tubers are shriveled, sprinkle a little water on them. Dahlias can be potted up in spring for an early start in the garden.

“The white sacs you see attached to the gladiolus corms are little bulblets. You can remove them or not. If left on the corm, they will grow larger, and may enhance the number of stems on the plant. If you remove them and plant them, it will take at least three years before they flower,” explains Joni Cotton, perennial manager, Hawthorn Gardens, Hawthorn Woods.


Page 8 of 8 pages ‹ First  < 6 7 8

categories

popular

questions

Can I purchase multiple issues of the magazine?

I have a dampish area with poor grass and moss that I would like to change to ground cover, but if I have only one plant, won’t it be boring? Can I get rid of the grass in winter or early spring?

What is the green worm that eats my roses and columbine every year?

ChicagolandGardening Advertisement