Proven Winners Advertisement

Dahlia Delights


Last summer, I had the pleasure of strolling through Cantigny Park in Wheaton, where the floral displays are always spectacular. Some of the loveliest plants there were the dahlias in shades of red, yellow, white and pink, some with burgundy leaves. I realized then that my garden was sorely lacking in these beautiful flowers.

‘Mystic Dreamer’

‘Mystic Spirit’

Liz Omura, curator of Cantigny’s Idea Garden, provided these photos — ‘Mystic Dreamer’, ‘Fire Mountain Red’ and ‘Mystic Spirit’ dahlias, and assured me that the plants are not that difficult to grow. You can try them out yourself this summer by picking up a few plants when the Southtown Dahlia Club hosts their annual dahlia plant and tuber sale on Sunday, April 28, 2013 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Crestwood Civic Center 14025 S. Kostner in Crestwood. Now’s your chance to speak with the experts on how to grow dahlias in containers and mix them alongside your perennials and other annuals.

‘Fire Mountain’

“The sale will feature newly rooted dahlia cuttings, sprouted dahlia tuber plants, and packaged tubers selling for $4 to $7 each,” says club member Sue Fitzgerald. “Our plants produce show quality blooms from July through November, and we will provide instructions on how to care for them. Most of these are varieties that you won’t find locally.” The sale will also offer a selection of vegetable, herbs and annuals. For more information contact Sue at 708-307-9198.

categories

popular

Article Thumbnail
Columns
Fake Gardening

I’ve been trying to characterize exactly what happens in my yard as the days grow shorter and the nights grow colder...


Article Thumbnail
Departments
From the Editor - SeptOct 2017

There are people who say that autumn is their favorite time of year. I’m not one of them, although God knows I’ve tried. Yes, …


Article Thumbnail
Columns
Dawn of the RhodoDeadDrons

As Ned crept up to the gate, he was struck by the eerie glow emanating from the yard. The last thing Ned wanted was eerie glow a


Article Thumbnail
Columns
Garden Un-Centered

Garden Un-Centered We all have our “happy” places–where we feel at home when we’re not at home. Some people are never ...


Article Thumbnail
Columns
Read ‘em and Weep

January (and February and December...oh, and add November to that list...and you might as well throw in March, just to complete


questions

I’m moving to a townhouse with limited direct sunlight. I would like to put a Japanese maple in a north-facing garden but don’t know if it will do well. What are the best kinds? Also, when is the best time to plant a small tree?

At the end of every winter, there are many shrubs growing along sidewalks that are dead and damaged either by salt, wind or dogs. Are there any shrubs that I can plant in these more exposed situations and expect them to survive?

We moved into a house with a lovely azalea that didn’t bloom. We thought it might have been over-pruned. Last fall we did not prune it and now it still hasn’t bloomed. I was hoping to transplant it this year, but it looks rather sickly. Shall we prune it again and give it another year? Can I still transplant it?

ChicagolandGardening Advertisement