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DECEMBER: What to Do in the Garden


In the Edible Garden

  • Cover strawberries with straw after the ground freezes.
  • Create a journal to record what worked in ‘07. Be specific about varieties that performed well. If possible, record soil amendments to track how beds perform next year.
  • Seed catalogues begin arriving late this month. If you’re not on a list, here are two you can’t live without: Burpee and Park Seed. Both are free. For a Midwest source, order from Jung Seed of Randolph, Wis. Their $3 fee is refundable with an order.
  • Organize leftover seeds, discard packets that are empty or nearly so.

In the Ornamental Garden

  • Plan a backyard wildlife habitat.
  • Protect newly planted broadleaf evergreens such as azaleas, boxwood and hollies with a burlap screen. Set screen stakes in ground before the ground freezes.
  • Protect newly planted trees from gnawing by rabbits and mice. Put a loose cylinder of hardware cloth or poultry wire around the trunk base.
  • Winterize all power equipment before storage.
  • Move stone statuary indoors to prevent frost cracks.
  • Feed the birds.
  • Mulch to keep cold in once soil freezes. This includes roses and perennials. Use chicken wire cages to contain shredded leaves in windy locations.
  • Continue to plant bulbs until the soil freezes solid.
  • Remove leaves from gutters and roof surfaces to avoid ice dams later. A blower works well on dry leaves.

In the Indoor Garden

  • Reduce or eliminate fertilizer for houseplants until spring.
  • Keep succulents and cacti on the dry side.Try indoor worm composting. Great for kids!
  • Make a Christmas candle arrangement.
  • Amaryllis stems bend toward light. Turn the plant frequently to keep it growing straight.
  • Keep poinsettias in a bright, non-drafty location. Check moisture frequently; do not allow to dry out.
  • Punch holes for drainage in decorative foil used to wrap pots of flowering plants.
  • If you use live mistletoe, keep it away from pets and children-all parts are poisonous.

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questions

I am sick of slugs. Perhaps if I knew their life cycle I could get rid of them. Where do they go over winter? Where do they come from? What is the best way to get rid of them?

What is the correct distance from my house to plant a tree? What is the correct distance from the lot line to plant a tree?

I have a dampish area with poor grass and moss that I would like to change to ground cover, but if I have only one plant, won’t it be boring? Can I get rid of the grass in winter or early spring?

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