Osmocote Advertisement

Q&A - Trees & Shrubs - Tree Position


Espoma Advertisement


Article Thumbnail
A Clear and Present Danger

I was recently interviewing a well-known garden writer about the benefits of an outdoor space in which to contemplate and …

Article Thumbnail
The Birds Is Coming!

“And good English has went.” That’s how it was. At least that’s how I remember it. I am, unfortunately, old enough to have ...

Article Thumbnail
Dismayed in the Shade

"President Jimmy Carter once said that life is not fair. I’m not positive, but I don’t think he coined that phrase. I’m not pos

Article Thumbnail
Basement Bounty

Decisions, decisions. What’s a devoted gardener to do with brugmansia as winter approaches?

Article Thumbnail
Let It Rain

Rain gardens are hot news, but are they pretty? Here are some examples that take the concept beyond mere buzz words.


I have two 20-year-old pine trees whose needles are turning brown on the west side of the plants. On the east side I have a compost pile.

I live in the St. Charles region and my soil is mostly clay. What is causing the browning? Should I get rid of the compost? How do I correct the damage?

What are some trends in gardening you see becoming more prevalent in the next few years?

I have read that purple coneflowers (Echinacea) are a good source of food for birds in the winter. Will they be okay if not trimmed back until spring? If so, how early should they be trimmed?

ChicagolandGardening Advertisement