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Article ThumbFEBRUARY: What to Do in the Garden

In the Edible Garden: Test leftover seeds for germination. Place ten seeds between moist paper toweling or cover with a thin layer of soil. Keep seeds warm and moist. If fewer than six seeds germinate, buy fresh seed. Sow onion seeds in late February or March indoors. When they germinate, keep the seedlings in a sunny, south- facing window or a few inches below fluorescent lights. Transplant the seedlings outdoors as soon as the soil is dry enough to work.


Article ThumbJANUARY: What to Do in the Garden

In the Edible Garden: Plan your vegetable garden for next year. If garden is large enough, allow for crop rotation. Make a list of tools that need to be purchased for the coming year. Can you move to a drip watering system and alleviate the need for broadcast sprinkling? Is this the year you will invest in a compost tea system to help your soil?


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questions

I have two 3-year-old rose of Sharon plants, about 20 feet apart. One blooms every year. The other plant forms about 100 buds and looks healthy, but it has not bloomed in the last two years. The buds are solidly closed and look as if they are rotting from the inside out. There does not seem to be any sign of insects on the plant. What is this problem?

At the end of every winter, there are many shrubs growing along sidewalks that are dead and damaged either by salt, wind or dogs. Are there any shrubs that I can plant in these more exposed situations and expect them to survive?

We all seem to plant the basic herbs like basil, rosemary and parsley. What suggestions can you offer for more exotic herbs that I could add to my garden to spice things up both for cooking and adding interest/beauty to my landscape?

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