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Article ThumbFEBRUARY: What to Do in the Garden

In the Edible Garden: Test leftover seeds for germination. Place ten seeds between moist paper toweling or cover with a thin layer of soil. Keep seeds warm and moist. If fewer than six seeds germinate, buy fresh seed. Sow onion seeds in late February or March indoors. When they germinate, keep the seedlings in a sunny, south- facing window or a few inches below fluorescent lights. Transplant the seedlings outdoors as soon as the soil is dry enough to work.


Article ThumbJANUARY: What to Do in the Garden

In the Edible Garden: Plan your vegetable garden for next year. If garden is large enough, allow for crop rotation. Make a list of tools that need to be purchased for the coming year. Can you move to a drip watering system and alleviate the need for broadcast sprinkling? Is this the year you will invest in a compost tea system to help your soil?


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Illinois is an agricultural state. We all know that, right? But did you also know that Illinois imports 90 percent of its food


questions

I have a nicely sheltered, rounded 7-foot tall Japanese red maple on the southeast corner of my backyard. Half of the tree has lost its leaves, the formerly red bark is turning gray, and a good-sized square of bark has been stripped off on the side that faces the yard. I sprayed the exposed bark with black pruning spray to close any entry for insects. I have not cut off any of the branches.

Does the winter have any effect on the tree? Should I look for some insect infestation? What should I do now?

What three dwarf shrubs do you think gardeners should know about and why?

Now that bedding impatiens (I. walleriana) are not recommended because of impatiens downy mildew, what are three good annuals for shade?

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