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Article ThumbFEBRUARY: What to Do in the Garden

In the Edible Garden: Test leftover seeds for germination. Place ten seeds between moist paper toweling or cover with a thin layer of soil. Keep seeds warm and moist. If fewer than six seeds germinate, buy fresh seed. Sow onion seeds in late February or March indoors. When they germinate, keep the seedlings in a sunny, south- facing window or a few inches below fluorescent lights. Transplant the seedlings outdoors as soon as the soil is dry enough to work.


Article ThumbJANUARY: What to Do in the Garden

In the Edible Garden: Plan your vegetable garden for next year. If garden is large enough, allow for crop rotation. Make a list of tools that need to be purchased for the coming year. Can you move to a drip watering system and alleviate the need for broadcast sprinkling? Is this the year you will invest in a compost tea system to help your soil?


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questions

What is rose rosette disease? I lost two antique roses and removed a hedge of multiflora roses that were supposed to be undesirable. How bad is it?

I have some peonies that I want to transplant but cannot plant them in their permanent place until next spring when our new house will be built. Can I dig them now and transplant them again next spring?

We moved into a house with a lovely azalea that didn’t bloom. We thought it might have been over-pruned. Last fall we did not prune it and now it still hasn’t bloomed. I was hoping to transplant it this year, but it looks rather sickly. Shall we prune it again and give it another year? Can I still transplant it?

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